FSM x LA cephalopPOD 19  In May 2019 Forum of Sensory Motion in partnership with Liquid Architecture will hold a second trip to witness the mating displays of the Giant Cuttlefish (Sepia Apama) in Whyalla, South Australia.  We will convene early in Adelaide on May 31st for a road trip, staying in the lighthouse cottages in Whyalla for four nights.  This iteration of the interstate, interspecies and investigative field trip has been funded by Australia Council.
       
     
 Our days will be spent snorkelling with the psychedelic cuttlefish and exploring the region.
       
     
 Our nights will be spent having candlelit dinners, dreaming up further adventures and collaborations around the campfire  or basking under the glowing of the soft orange rotating beam of the lighthouse beacon.
       
     
 Brodie Ellis with Cameron Robbins, about to enter another realm, Point Lowly 2018.
       
     
 Joyce Hinterding in action 2018. The conditions were grey and rainy above water and calm and psychedelic beneath. The overcast day provided the perfect conditions for snorkelling as it helped to enhance the colours below.
       
     
 Jason Hood during a Kelp D/J performance for The Yurting XV: The Night of the Cuttlefish, a night of performative outcomes from the 2018 trip also featuring Jannah Quill, David Haines, Joyce Hinterding and James Grant.
       
     
 Artists will receive an info pack for the journey including cuttlefish reading and viewing resources. Witnessing the cuttlefish display armed with prior knowledge of the animals behaviours enhances the experience and this source material is invaluable for the creation of works.
       
     
 Mission Statement: Cuttlefish  For FSM/LA cephaloPOD19 we aim to enter the water gently, interacting with the cuttlefish in a minimal way with little to no contact. We are there as artists (with marine biologist leanings) to offer up a new reading of the mating signals and patterning language that these creatures generously allow us to witness in close proximity. We are not there to commodify them or extract scientific data but rather to act as creative collaborative conduits to receive their messages, which we will then interpret and transmit through our practises back on land.  To avoid exploitation or potential for harm, outcomes form this trip will be land based (ie no art outcomes will take place in the water) any documentation - filming/sound recording etc will be respectfully controlled and people and their tech gear are asked to remain at a distance from the cuttlefish so as not to alter their behaviours.  Imagery above gleaned off the internet through Lichen Kelp’s investigations into Cuttlefish perception.
       
     
 Mission statement: Humans  >Support Letter from David Haines and Joyce Hinterding<    To whom it may concern,  Joyce Hinterding and I recently had the pleasure to join a bunch of artists on a journey to visit the great cuttlefish aggregation in Whyalla, initiated by Lichen Kemp. Our experience on this journey was transformative in so many ways, bringing together field work and informal research, and the sharing of ideas and incredible sensory experiences with a group of exemplary artists that crossed generations. Joyce and I came away with the feeling that so many new ideas and initiatives were brought to the table, simply by virtue of being together in an extraordinary and profound situation and that this simple reality was enough to get all kinds of creative juices flowing.  Late one evening, sitting around the fireplace at the Point Lowly Lighthouse in Whyalla, Joyce and I recalled the impact that staying at the Cape Bruny Lighthouse in Tasmania had on our practice at the turn of the millennium, a pivotal experience for us and how amazing it was to see another bunch of artists along with ourselves, also having a life changing experience during this artist-initiated adventure. Judging by the email flying back and forth between the participants and the nature of the conversations I am sure the impact of this first journey will be profound. We managed to do all of this as a group, enter the sea safely, interact with these extraordinary animals sensitively, and engage intelligently and creatively. I think what Lichen has done here should become a model – a nomadic model of a residency, sometimes with softer outcomes than the usual, and at other times with the bar raised in terms of engagement – bringing together the brightest artists from all walks of life with the best thinkers and practioners across fields. I say this, because something that stood out and that we all felt that could be enhanced in the future if we were to do this type of thing again, was the heightened sense of curiosity from the group in terms of expertise outside of our own disciplines. Imagine the exchange that could happen between artists, climatologists, chaos theorists, botanists and marine biologists, theorists and writers and others if we were all to embark on a significant journey together.  What we found so inspiring was the confirmation that our community can work both within and out-side of institutional settings. The  Forum of Sensory Motion  straddles both worlds and proves that there is an important feedback loop between formal and informal settings in terms of practice. Already the experience of visiting the cuttlefish has had an impact on our work. The exchange alone has already generated a future highly successful performance evening in Melbourne, a serious body of writing begun, and thoughts of a collaborative experimental documentary film in the future. The idea of similar kinds of forums, or mobile residencies in other parts of the country have been floated. And now the project  Forum of Sensory Motion  has consolidated into a second more ambitious trip that will take place this year once again, in Whyalla.  This year’s adventure is titled  cephaloPOD  and is being held in partnership with  Liquid Architecture  and will be a substantial development on what took place last time. We are already excited about how cross fertilization will be able to really enhance the works that we will make through dialogue with the other artists and scientists such as of Prof. Bronwyn Gillanders (South Australia) who is willing to work with us in an advisory, collaborative capacity.  We are super excited about the new work we have planned that will come from attending  cephaloPOD , the fact that support is being asked for a performance evening that will serve the creative output of some 15 artists says a lot about the way the applicants are thinking…building a community of works that are in dialogue, maximizing the outcomes of such an amazing journey and introducing new people to a unique interdisciplinary creative endeavor.  Joyce and I look forward to the next Forum of Sensory Motion, we will be there with boots on. We wholeheartedly look forward to building our relationship with this incredible bunch of awesome artists.    David Haines and Joyce Hinterding
       
     
 Artists….  Joyce Hinterding  Aeriology   http://www.haineshinterding.net/category/hinterding/  Joyce Hinterding is an artist recognised internationally for her work across sculpture, object arts, sound art and digital arts. She produces works that explore physical and virtual dynamics. Her practice is based on investigations into energetic forces, through custom built field recording and monitoring technologies. These explorations into acoustic and electromagnetic phenomena have produced large sculptural antenna works, video and sound-producing installations and experimental audio works for performance.  She often collaborates with artist David Haines to produce large-scale immersive video and sound works. She is represented by Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney, and her recorded audio work has been released by Antiopic NYC and Sigma Editions.
       
     
 Justin Shoulder/ AKA Phasmahammer  http://justinshoulder.com/    Justin Shoulder is an artist working in performance, sculpture, video and nightlife/community events production. He was born on the un-ceded lands of the Gadigal people (Sydney) and is of Filipino and European heritage. His main body of work Phasmahammer is an ecology of alter personas based on queered ancestral myth. These creatures are embodied through hand crafted costumes and prosthesis and animated by their own gestural languages. Shoulder uses his body and craft to forge connections between queer, migrant, spiritual and intercultural experiences. He is a founding member of queer artist collective The Glitter Militia and Club Ate with collaborator Bhenji Ra.  Shoulder’s works have been presented across Australia and Internationally where he works between gallery, nightclub, theatre and cinema contexts. Recent performance highlights include: Perth Institute of Contemporary Art (AUS), Premiere of theatre work Carrion, Performance Space, Sydney (AUS) + subsequent tour to Artshouse, Melb (AUS), Fusebox Festival, Texas (USA), Museum Macan, Jakarta (IDN), Roskilde (DEN), M+ (HK), Singapore Art Museum (SGD). Asia Pacfic Triennial 8 GOMA (AUS).
       
     
 Stephanie Kabanyana Kanyandekwe   http://kabanyana.com/
       
     
 Libby Harward, image via Liquid Architecture  http://libbyharward.art/  https://liquidarchitecture.org.au/events/already-occupied/    Libby Harward is a Quandamooka artist of Moreton Bay in Queensland, and a descendent of the Ngugi people from Mulgumpin (Moreton Island) living on Yugambeh Country, the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.    Her solo work has predominated on mainland country, where she resides, that has become highly urbanised and calls for an artistic response that seeks to uncover and reinstate the cultural significance of that place, which always was, and remains, there. Her artistic process engages traditional custodians in the evolution of her work.  Since completing a Creative Arts Degree in 2000, Libby has worked as an arts worker, social change arts worker, arts in health worker, therapeutic artist, youth worker, community health worker and creative collaborator.  She is currently the Creative Director of Creative Inclusive and a lead mentor for emerging artists through DRASTIC Artists Run Initiative (a group specialising in youth health and wellbeing through the arts). Both initiatives operate on the Gold Coast and expand into, the South-East Queensland, and northern New South Wales region. Through her community art projects and large mural work, Libby has also worked in Northern Territory and the Torres Strait, predominately with young people using theatre and visual arts to assist their expressions of identity and/or re-connections to country and culture.  Libby has a strong commitment to strengthening community work. Over the past decade she has included and developed her community and cross – cultural consultations practices during both commercial and familial art projects with successful outcomes that are unique and reflective of each community and their cultural expression. The focus of this work has been on sharing stories of strength and pride on walls, buildings and under bridges, within cultural institutional contexts in partnership with state and national museums in Brisbane and Canberra.  Libby’s therapeutic arts focus is about exploring connection and relationship with a focus on first nation knowledges as well as neurobiology, attachment and trauma integration. Her work is about relationships and connection with people, with country and with culture. She is extremely passionate about providing opportunities for people to explore their potential using strength based principles with a strong focus on inclusivity.
       
     
 Michael Candy,  Synthetic Pollinizer   https://michaelcandy.com/  Michael Candy uses physical technologies to impart systems on ecology and society.   Candy has been involved in many international and local projects and exhibitions, notably: The Kathmandu Triennale (Kathmandu,Nepal), Pratt Manhattan Gallery (NYC, USA), The Forum of Sensory Motion (Kochi, India and Athens, Greece), The Instrument Builders Project + Hackteria Lab (Yogyakarta, Indonesia) and Hawapi (Huepetuhe,Peru).   In 2015 Michael won the WRO Award as part of the 16th Media Art biennale in Poland and later Prix Cube (Paris, France) with Big Dipper.    For the event at Mission to Seafarers Michael Candy will be exhibtiing his self built robot works as well as a film based on cuttlefish footage retrieved from a submersible robot he has created.
       
     
 Cameron Robbins,  Field Lines,  MONA Tasmania.  Cameron’s work is based on interaction with natural forces and the elements. He has devised many ways of producing a kind of collaboration between artist and nature. This is evident in the series of Wind Drawing Machines. These mechanical devices are set up in different locations to collect random wind energy and translate it into a strangely readable format of ink drawings on paper, which themselves take on the form of the storm. This work has led to an exploration of the forms of the vortex, the focus of natural energy. Cameron has designed and built a series of Vortex Chambers, in order to study, exhibit, and film this phenomenon.  Further research into the elemental, combined with his musical career on clarinet and saxophone, has lead to the production of the Steam Organ, a self-determining musical device which is built into a large furnace structure. The Organ is allowed to play freely in the fire, expressing the heat, wind and ambient acoustic. Other sound works include  The Sea Wailing  – a tide-powered organ on the cliffs of South Australia .  Cameron has devised, co-curated, and produced many performance events of large-scale works involving composers, complex instruments, installations, fire and sound. The Current was a Double Venturi event at Melbourne Town Hall, co-curated with Peter Knight, involving 8 artists and composers creating site-specific works throughout the building. Other events include Construction in Process VI The Bridge opening night and Queenscliff New Year’s Eve 2000.  Commissions of a monumental and longlasting outdoor sculptural nature include  Meta-pier (2006) , and  Raphael Stone Circles (2005)  , a solar calendar, in outer Melbourne.include  Double Vortex (2006)  for CH2 (City of Melbourne ),  Time Beacon (2001)  in Altona (VIC), and  Double Sump (1997)  in Marree, outback South Australia .  Since 1990 he has produced exhibitions, residencies and commissions in Australia, Europe and Asia . These include shows at Museum of Old and New Art MONA (Hobart), National Gallery of Victoria (International), Setouchi Festival of Art Japan, Artspace, (Sydney), Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, ( Melbourne ), Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, Latrobe Regional Gallery, (Morwell) , Gallery Barry Keldoulis (Sydney), East China Normal University (Shanghai), Hong Kong and Korean International Art Fairs. Cameron was Artist in Residence at NKD – Nordic Arts Centre in 2013.  Cameron also regularly plays jazz and experimental music on clarinet and bass clarinet, and is a guest lecturer at RMIT Visual Arts and Communication.
       
     
 Jannah Quill, solar generated techno.  https://jannahquill.co/   JANNAH QUILL  is a Sydney and Melbourne based artist whose experimental approach to the uncasing of electrical processes manifests in installation, performance and recorded sound. In her live performances, she sculpts cracked everyday electronics into pulsating, beguiling and menacing fields of static and tone. Her approach to sound-making is heavily influenced by her interest in dance and club music apparatus and the ways in which this can blend with experimental, improvisatory and collaborative music.  Jannah’s music and art practice embraces ordinary digital interfaces and technological machines as materials to generate new experiences reinterpreted from the intended consumer use of the digitally banal. In her hands, solar panels generate audio signal from off-the-shelf lighting products; a laptop’s text-to-speech function becomes vocal samples on thumping techno driven tracks; and game development programs are used to create installations of deconstructed digital imagery.
       
     
 Lichen Kelp, pictured with Benjamin Hancock from a Kelp D performance for FSM Greece 17 outcomes, at Testing Grounds.  Lichen is one half of Forum of Sensory Motion with Dylan Martorell and devised and curated the Cuttlefish trip in 2018 with 11 artists. Kelp is partnering with Liquid Architecture to hold the 2019 edition and performative outcomes at Mission to Seafarers this September.  LA has just announced extra funding to expand the Cuttlefish program as part of their Why Listen to Animals 2019 program. This will be a series of kids workshops held at Melbourne Museum over the same weekend as the Mission to Seafarers event.   http://lichenkelp.com/fsm-giant-cuttlefish-trip/   Other Lichen Kelp/ FSM projects this year include an event Kelp is curating at the System Garde, Melbourne University in November. This is being funded by Ian Potter Foundation and includes artists Benjamin Hancock, Loren Kronemyer-Pony Express, Dylan Martorell, Nic Dowse - Honeyfingers, David Haines, Kelp D and musicians Nina Buchanan and Fia Fiell.   See link for some images from an earlier incarnation of this program    http://lichenkelp.com/performance-kelp-d-with-carmen-chan   Also Lichen is programming the Federation Bells later this year, presenting workshops at Signal and holding group residencies in partnership with FLOAT Gippsland, and The Unconformity festival.
       
     
 David Haines, Kirlian Plant Photography  http://www.haineshinterding.net/category/haines/  David Haines has been a practising artist for nearly 20 years and has exhibited in museums, festivals and alternative exhibition spaces, including installations for the Tate Gallery, Liverpool, Artspace, Sydney, Sao Paulo Biennale 2004, CACSA in Adelaide 2005, The Physics Room (NZ), the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Museum of Contemporary Art, the 13th Biennale of Sydney (The World May Be) Fantastic and The Liquid Sea.  His collaborations with Joyce Hinterding have produced major works that have been shown in Tasmania, Sydney and Madrid, and have been featured in the opening exhibition for the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, as well as in Japan, Europe and North America.  Haines has also held academic positions in contemporary arts at COFA (UNSW) and at the University of Western Sydney.  For the cephaloPOD 19 event David is planning a sound performance with underwater black and white footage of the cuttlefish as well as exhibiting an ocean scent based on their immediate environmnet.
       
     
 Selena De Carvalho,  Lake Pedder Earthworm-   The Evolutionary Straitjacket   https://selenadecarvalho.com/   Selena de Carvalho  is an inter-disciplinary artist based in Longley Village, Tasmania where she actively engages in many different aspects of creative life, from building kinetic artworks to growing a garden. Her practice responds to notions of personal ecology and human interaction with the environment, often relating to the perceived consumption of wilderness and lived experiences of wildness, focusing on the core paradox of how we (humanity) yearn for the untamed, and yet in our desire to experience the wild, consciously or unconsciously seek to control it. This paradox operates as a framework for deeper inquiry within Selena's practice. Technology and creativity are used as a means to raise questions as opposed to providing answers.  Selena’s work has received numerous awards and residencies, and has exhibited extensively. Her creative practice is a vehicle to generate critical and creative inquiry in response to and translation of  this time in which we are living.   Selena was the 2016 recipient of the prestigious Shenberg Art Fellowship for her work  Ecological Huants (ii) exhibited as part of Hatched at PICA (Perth Institute of Contemporary Art). The curatorial board describe the work as “ both intricate and affecting. It is a work that is experiential in the best possible sense, with the ability to draw viewers into its poetic sense of mystery and magic. Both subtle and sophisticated, the work allows for different levels of engagement, moments of solitude and room for contemplation.” In 2018 she was an artistic associate for Faux Mo as part of Mona Foma and completed a collaboration with CSIRO, IMAS and Constance ARI as well as undertaking a PhD research scholarship with UTAS.      For the cephaloPOD 19 event Selena will be creating an interactive colour changing ink installation.
       
     
 Debris Facility,  Polyphonic Thinking   https://www.instagram.com/debris.facility/?hl=en  https://acca.melbourne/program/debris-facility-artist-talk/  Debris Facility is a Melbourne-based cross media artist, often generating installation, sculpture, jewellery and other wearable works. Since graduating from ANU, Canberra School of Art in 2007, they have sustained an active art practice with projects through Australia, New Zealand and Indonesia through places such as Langeng Art Foundation, Gertrude Contemporary, George Paton Gallery, RM Project Space, Dog Park Projects, TCB artinc., MUMA, Rice and Beans, Y3K, Utopian slumps, Slopes, Pieces of Eight, Alaska Projects and Sutton Gallery.    As part of Debris’ outcomes for the cephaloPOD 19 event they are collaborating with Lichen Kelp on developing an e textile based on cuttlefish skin, that is colour changing and responsive and will be the basis of a costume.
       
     
 Michael Dulaney is an award-winning writer and journalist. He is an environment columnist for the  Lifted Brow  and his work has appeared in  The Monthly ,  Griffith Review ,  Overland  and the  ABC , among others.  In 2017 he was shortlisted for the Scribe Nonfiction Prize for Young Writers and won the Overland Fair Australia Prize.  Michael will be attending the artist camp and producing an in depth piece of responsive writing. He was based in South Australia for many years and has done many pieces around the region of Whyalla and has an existing interest in the cuttlefish. Michaels writing will be incorporated in an experimental performative sense into the event at Mision to Seafarers and we will also look at seperate funding to coproduce a podcast together. Science Gallery, Melbourne University have expressed interest in co producing this work.   The Eyes Of Genius  - Lyrebird article from the Lifted Brow
       
     
 Meagan Streader,  Response VII (Partition III)
       
     
 The unique and atmospheric Norla Dome room at Mission to Seafarers, Docklands Melbourne will be the venue for performative and exhibition outcomes for FSM/ LA cephaloPOD in September 2019.  We are seeking Creative Victoria funding for this event.  The national and international as well as local marine history of this building connects the event in Melbournes port to the earlier roadtrip to the shores of Whyalla in an enticing oceanic sense.  cephaloPOD Future forms:  Lichen will be seeking funding beyond Creative Victoria to further extend the life span of the cephaloPOD project over multiple venues and partnerships, as well as producing a podcast on the cuttlefish, Whyalla and the artist residency program over the coming years.  Lichen also has met with Programme Director, Ryan Jefferies of Science Museum, Melbourne. THe Science Gallery are interested in hosting a series of cuttlefish related outcomes across 2019-2021. Ryan is also connecting Lichen, FSM and LA to MOD, a future focused science gallery based out of the University of South Australia.. Tessa Laird, Professor of…. has expressed interest in attending future configurations of the cephaloPOD trip and joining a cuttlefish reading and research group that FSM and LA will be holding at Siteworks in March as part of an outcome from a writers residency.
       
     
 FSM x LA cephalopPOD 19  In May 2019 Forum of Sensory Motion in partnership with Liquid Architecture will hold a second trip to witness the mating displays of the Giant Cuttlefish (Sepia Apama) in Whyalla, South Australia.  We will convene early in Adelaide on May 31st for a road trip, staying in the lighthouse cottages in Whyalla for four nights.  This iteration of the interstate, interspecies and investigative field trip has been funded by Australia Council.
       
     

FSM x LA cephalopPOD 19

In May 2019 Forum of Sensory Motion in partnership with Liquid Architecture will hold a second trip to witness the mating displays of the Giant Cuttlefish (Sepia Apama) in Whyalla, South Australia.

We will convene early in Adelaide on May 31st for a road trip, staying in the lighthouse cottages in Whyalla for four nights.

This iteration of the interstate, interspecies and investigative field trip has been funded by Australia Council.

 Our days will be spent snorkelling with the psychedelic cuttlefish and exploring the region.
       
     

Our days will be spent snorkelling with the psychedelic cuttlefish and exploring the region.

 Our nights will be spent having candlelit dinners, dreaming up further adventures and collaborations around the campfire  or basking under the glowing of the soft orange rotating beam of the lighthouse beacon.
       
     

Our nights will be spent having candlelit dinners, dreaming up further adventures and collaborations around the campfire or basking under the glowing of the soft orange rotating beam of the lighthouse beacon.

 Brodie Ellis with Cameron Robbins, about to enter another realm, Point Lowly 2018.
       
     

Brodie Ellis with Cameron Robbins, about to enter another realm, Point Lowly 2018.

 Joyce Hinterding in action 2018. The conditions were grey and rainy above water and calm and psychedelic beneath. The overcast day provided the perfect conditions for snorkelling as it helped to enhance the colours below.
       
     

Joyce Hinterding in action 2018. The conditions were grey and rainy above water and calm and psychedelic beneath. The overcast day provided the perfect conditions for snorkelling as it helped to enhance the colours below.

 Jason Hood during a Kelp D/J performance for The Yurting XV: The Night of the Cuttlefish, a night of performative outcomes from the 2018 trip also featuring Jannah Quill, David Haines, Joyce Hinterding and James Grant.
       
     

Jason Hood during a Kelp D/J performance for The Yurting XV: The Night of the Cuttlefish, a night of performative outcomes from the 2018 trip also featuring Jannah Quill, David Haines, Joyce Hinterding and James Grant.

 Artists will receive an info pack for the journey including cuttlefish reading and viewing resources. Witnessing the cuttlefish display armed with prior knowledge of the animals behaviours enhances the experience and this source material is invaluable for the creation of works.
       
     

Artists will receive an info pack for the journey including cuttlefish reading and viewing resources. Witnessing the cuttlefish display armed with prior knowledge of the animals behaviours enhances the experience and this source material is invaluable for the creation of works.

 Mission Statement: Cuttlefish  For FSM/LA cephaloPOD19 we aim to enter the water gently, interacting with the cuttlefish in a minimal way with little to no contact. We are there as artists (with marine biologist leanings) to offer up a new reading of the mating signals and patterning language that these creatures generously allow us to witness in close proximity. We are not there to commodify them or extract scientific data but rather to act as creative collaborative conduits to receive their messages, which we will then interpret and transmit through our practises back on land.  To avoid exploitation or potential for harm, outcomes form this trip will be land based (ie no art outcomes will take place in the water) any documentation - filming/sound recording etc will be respectfully controlled and people and their tech gear are asked to remain at a distance from the cuttlefish so as not to alter their behaviours.  Imagery above gleaned off the internet through Lichen Kelp’s investigations into Cuttlefish perception.
       
     

Mission Statement: Cuttlefish

For FSM/LA cephaloPOD19 we aim to enter the water gently, interacting with the cuttlefish in a minimal way with little to no contact. We are there as artists (with marine biologist leanings) to offer up a new reading of the mating signals and patterning language that these creatures generously allow us to witness in close proximity. We are not there to commodify them or extract scientific data but rather to act as creative collaborative conduits to receive their messages, which we will then interpret and transmit through our practises back on land.

To avoid exploitation or potential for harm, outcomes form this trip will be land based (ie no art outcomes will take place in the water) any documentation - filming/sound recording etc will be respectfully controlled and people and their tech gear are asked to remain at a distance from the cuttlefish so as not to alter their behaviours.

Imagery above gleaned off the internet through Lichen Kelp’s investigations into Cuttlefish perception.

 Mission statement: Humans  >Support Letter from David Haines and Joyce Hinterding<    To whom it may concern,  Joyce Hinterding and I recently had the pleasure to join a bunch of artists on a journey to visit the great cuttlefish aggregation in Whyalla, initiated by Lichen Kemp. Our experience on this journey was transformative in so many ways, bringing together field work and informal research, and the sharing of ideas and incredible sensory experiences with a group of exemplary artists that crossed generations. Joyce and I came away with the feeling that so many new ideas and initiatives were brought to the table, simply by virtue of being together in an extraordinary and profound situation and that this simple reality was enough to get all kinds of creative juices flowing.  Late one evening, sitting around the fireplace at the Point Lowly Lighthouse in Whyalla, Joyce and I recalled the impact that staying at the Cape Bruny Lighthouse in Tasmania had on our practice at the turn of the millennium, a pivotal experience for us and how amazing it was to see another bunch of artists along with ourselves, also having a life changing experience during this artist-initiated adventure. Judging by the email flying back and forth between the participants and the nature of the conversations I am sure the impact of this first journey will be profound. We managed to do all of this as a group, enter the sea safely, interact with these extraordinary animals sensitively, and engage intelligently and creatively. I think what Lichen has done here should become a model – a nomadic model of a residency, sometimes with softer outcomes than the usual, and at other times with the bar raised in terms of engagement – bringing together the brightest artists from all walks of life with the best thinkers and practioners across fields. I say this, because something that stood out and that we all felt that could be enhanced in the future if we were to do this type of thing again, was the heightened sense of curiosity from the group in terms of expertise outside of our own disciplines. Imagine the exchange that could happen between artists, climatologists, chaos theorists, botanists and marine biologists, theorists and writers and others if we were all to embark on a significant journey together.  What we found so inspiring was the confirmation that our community can work both within and out-side of institutional settings. The  Forum of Sensory Motion  straddles both worlds and proves that there is an important feedback loop between formal and informal settings in terms of practice. Already the experience of visiting the cuttlefish has had an impact on our work. The exchange alone has already generated a future highly successful performance evening in Melbourne, a serious body of writing begun, and thoughts of a collaborative experimental documentary film in the future. The idea of similar kinds of forums, or mobile residencies in other parts of the country have been floated. And now the project  Forum of Sensory Motion  has consolidated into a second more ambitious trip that will take place this year once again, in Whyalla.  This year’s adventure is titled  cephaloPOD  and is being held in partnership with  Liquid Architecture  and will be a substantial development on what took place last time. We are already excited about how cross fertilization will be able to really enhance the works that we will make through dialogue with the other artists and scientists such as of Prof. Bronwyn Gillanders (South Australia) who is willing to work with us in an advisory, collaborative capacity.  We are super excited about the new work we have planned that will come from attending  cephaloPOD , the fact that support is being asked for a performance evening that will serve the creative output of some 15 artists says a lot about the way the applicants are thinking…building a community of works that are in dialogue, maximizing the outcomes of such an amazing journey and introducing new people to a unique interdisciplinary creative endeavor.  Joyce and I look forward to the next Forum of Sensory Motion, we will be there with boots on. We wholeheartedly look forward to building our relationship with this incredible bunch of awesome artists.    David Haines and Joyce Hinterding
       
     

Mission statement: Humans

>Support Letter from David Haines and Joyce Hinterding<

To whom it may concern,

Joyce Hinterding and I recently had the pleasure to join a bunch of artists on a journey to visit the great cuttlefish aggregation in Whyalla, initiated by Lichen Kemp. Our experience on this journey was transformative in so many ways, bringing together field work and informal research, and the sharing of ideas and incredible sensory experiences with a group of exemplary artists that crossed generations. Joyce and I came away with the feeling that so many new ideas and initiatives were brought to the table, simply by virtue of being together in an extraordinary and profound situation and that this simple reality was enough to get all kinds of creative juices flowing.

Late one evening, sitting around the fireplace at the Point Lowly Lighthouse in Whyalla, Joyce and I recalled the impact that staying at the Cape Bruny Lighthouse in Tasmania had on our practice at the turn of the millennium, a pivotal experience for us and how amazing it was to see another bunch of artists along with ourselves, also having a life changing experience during this artist-initiated adventure. Judging by the email flying back and forth between the participants and the nature of the conversations I am sure the impact of this first journey will be profound. We managed to do all of this as a group, enter the sea safely, interact with these extraordinary animals sensitively, and engage intelligently and creatively. I think what Lichen has done here should become a model – a nomadic model of a residency, sometimes with softer outcomes than the usual, and at other times with the bar raised in terms of engagement – bringing together the brightest artists from all walks of life with the best thinkers and practioners across fields. I say this, because something that stood out and that we all felt that could be enhanced in the future if we were to do this type of thing again, was the heightened sense of curiosity from the group in terms of expertise outside of our own disciplines. Imagine the exchange that could happen between artists, climatologists, chaos theorists, botanists and marine biologists, theorists and writers and others if we were all to embark on a significant journey together.

What we found so inspiring was the confirmation that our community can work both within and out-side of institutional settings. The Forum of Sensory Motion straddles both worlds and proves that there is an important feedback loop between formal and informal settings in terms of practice. Already the experience of visiting the cuttlefish has had an impact on our work. The exchange alone has already generated a future highly successful performance evening in Melbourne, a serious body of writing begun, and thoughts of a collaborative experimental documentary film in the future. The idea of similar kinds of forums, or mobile residencies in other parts of the country have been floated. And now the project Forum of Sensory Motion has consolidated into a second more ambitious trip that will take place this year once again, in Whyalla.

This year’s adventure is titled cephaloPOD and is being held in partnership with Liquid Architecture and will be a substantial development on what took place last time. We are already excited about how cross fertilization will be able to really enhance the works that we will make through dialogue with the other artists and scientists such as of Prof. Bronwyn Gillanders (South Australia) who is willing to work with us in an advisory, collaborative capacity.

We are super excited about the new work we have planned that will come from attending cephaloPOD, the fact that support is being asked for a performance evening that will serve the creative output of some 15 artists says a lot about the way the applicants are thinking…building a community of works that are in dialogue, maximizing the outcomes of such an amazing journey and introducing new people to a unique interdisciplinary creative endeavor.

Joyce and I look forward to the next Forum of Sensory Motion, we will be there with boots on. We wholeheartedly look forward to building our relationship with this incredible bunch of awesome artists.

David Haines and Joyce Hinterding

 Artists….  Joyce Hinterding  Aeriology   http://www.haineshinterding.net/category/hinterding/  Joyce Hinterding is an artist recognised internationally for her work across sculpture, object arts, sound art and digital arts. She produces works that explore physical and virtual dynamics. Her practice is based on investigations into energetic forces, through custom built field recording and monitoring technologies. These explorations into acoustic and electromagnetic phenomena have produced large sculptural antenna works, video and sound-producing installations and experimental audio works for performance.  She often collaborates with artist David Haines to produce large-scale immersive video and sound works. She is represented by Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney, and her recorded audio work has been released by Antiopic NYC and Sigma Editions.
       
     

Artists….

Joyce Hinterding Aeriology

http://www.haineshinterding.net/category/hinterding/

Joyce Hinterding is an artist recognised internationally for her work across sculpture, object arts, sound art and digital arts. She produces works that explore physical and virtual dynamics. Her practice is based on investigations into energetic forces, through custom built field recording and monitoring technologies. These explorations into acoustic and electromagnetic phenomena have produced large sculptural antenna works, video and sound-producing installations and experimental audio works for performance. She often collaborates with artist David Haines to produce large-scale immersive video and sound works. She is represented by Sarah Cottier Gallery, Sydney, and her recorded audio work has been released by Antiopic NYC and Sigma Editions.

 Justin Shoulder/ AKA Phasmahammer  http://justinshoulder.com/    Justin Shoulder is an artist working in performance, sculpture, video and nightlife/community events production. He was born on the un-ceded lands of the Gadigal people (Sydney) and is of Filipino and European heritage. His main body of work Phasmahammer is an ecology of alter personas based on queered ancestral myth. These creatures are embodied through hand crafted costumes and prosthesis and animated by their own gestural languages. Shoulder uses his body and craft to forge connections between queer, migrant, spiritual and intercultural experiences. He is a founding member of queer artist collective The Glitter Militia and Club Ate with collaborator Bhenji Ra.  Shoulder’s works have been presented across Australia and Internationally where he works between gallery, nightclub, theatre and cinema contexts. Recent performance highlights include: Perth Institute of Contemporary Art (AUS), Premiere of theatre work Carrion, Performance Space, Sydney (AUS) + subsequent tour to Artshouse, Melb (AUS), Fusebox Festival, Texas (USA), Museum Macan, Jakarta (IDN), Roskilde (DEN), M+ (HK), Singapore Art Museum (SGD). Asia Pacfic Triennial 8 GOMA (AUS).
       
     

Justin Shoulder/ AKA Phasmahammer

http://justinshoulder.com/

Justin Shoulder is an artist working in performance, sculpture, video and nightlife/community events production. He was born on the un-ceded lands of the Gadigal people (Sydney) and is of Filipino and European heritage. His main body of work Phasmahammer is an ecology of alter personas based on queered ancestral myth. These creatures are embodied through hand crafted costumes and prosthesis and animated by their own gestural languages. Shoulder uses his body and craft to forge connections between queer, migrant, spiritual and intercultural experiences. He is a founding member of queer artist collective The Glitter Militia and Club Ate with collaborator Bhenji Ra.

Shoulder’s works have been presented across Australia and Internationally where he works between gallery, nightclub, theatre and cinema contexts. Recent performance highlights include: Perth Institute of Contemporary Art (AUS), Premiere of theatre work Carrion, Performance Space, Sydney (AUS) + subsequent tour to Artshouse, Melb (AUS), Fusebox Festival, Texas (USA), Museum Macan, Jakarta (IDN), Roskilde (DEN), M+ (HK), Singapore Art Museum (SGD). Asia Pacfic Triennial 8 GOMA (AUS).

 Stephanie Kabanyana Kanyandekwe   http://kabanyana.com/
       
     

Stephanie Kabanyana Kanyandekwe

http://kabanyana.com/

 Libby Harward, image via Liquid Architecture  http://libbyharward.art/  https://liquidarchitecture.org.au/events/already-occupied/    Libby Harward is a Quandamooka artist of Moreton Bay in Queensland, and a descendent of the Ngugi people from Mulgumpin (Moreton Island) living on Yugambeh Country, the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.    Her solo work has predominated on mainland country, where she resides, that has become highly urbanised and calls for an artistic response that seeks to uncover and reinstate the cultural significance of that place, which always was, and remains, there. Her artistic process engages traditional custodians in the evolution of her work.  Since completing a Creative Arts Degree in 2000, Libby has worked as an arts worker, social change arts worker, arts in health worker, therapeutic artist, youth worker, community health worker and creative collaborator.  She is currently the Creative Director of Creative Inclusive and a lead mentor for emerging artists through DRASTIC Artists Run Initiative (a group specialising in youth health and wellbeing through the arts). Both initiatives operate on the Gold Coast and expand into, the South-East Queensland, and northern New South Wales region. Through her community art projects and large mural work, Libby has also worked in Northern Territory and the Torres Strait, predominately with young people using theatre and visual arts to assist their expressions of identity and/or re-connections to country and culture.  Libby has a strong commitment to strengthening community work. Over the past decade she has included and developed her community and cross – cultural consultations practices during both commercial and familial art projects with successful outcomes that are unique and reflective of each community and their cultural expression. The focus of this work has been on sharing stories of strength and pride on walls, buildings and under bridges, within cultural institutional contexts in partnership with state and national museums in Brisbane and Canberra.  Libby’s therapeutic arts focus is about exploring connection and relationship with a focus on first nation knowledges as well as neurobiology, attachment and trauma integration. Her work is about relationships and connection with people, with country and with culture. She is extremely passionate about providing opportunities for people to explore their potential using strength based principles with a strong focus on inclusivity.
       
     

Libby Harward, image via Liquid Architecture

http://libbyharward.art/

https://liquidarchitecture.org.au/events/already-occupied/

Libby Harward is a Quandamooka artist of Moreton Bay in Queensland, and a descendent of the Ngugi people from Mulgumpin (Moreton Island) living on Yugambeh Country, the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Her solo work has predominated on mainland country, where she resides, that has become highly urbanised and calls for an artistic response that seeks to uncover and reinstate the cultural significance of that place, which always was, and remains, there. Her artistic process engages traditional custodians in the evolution of her work.

Since completing a Creative Arts Degree in 2000, Libby has worked as an arts worker, social change arts worker, arts in health worker, therapeutic artist, youth worker, community health worker and creative collaborator.

She is currently the Creative Director of Creative Inclusive and a lead mentor for emerging artists through DRASTIC Artists Run Initiative (a group specialising in youth health and wellbeing through the arts). Both initiatives operate on the Gold Coast and expand into, the South-East Queensland, and northern New South Wales region. Through her community art projects and large mural work, Libby has also worked in Northern Territory and the Torres Strait, predominately with young people using theatre and visual arts to assist their expressions of identity and/or re-connections to country and culture.

Libby has a strong commitment to strengthening community work. Over the past decade she has included and developed her community and cross – cultural consultations practices during both commercial and familial art projects with successful outcomes that are unique and reflective of each community and their cultural expression. The focus of this work has been on sharing stories of strength and pride on walls, buildings and under bridges, within cultural institutional contexts in partnership with state and national museums in Brisbane and Canberra.

Libby’s therapeutic arts focus is about exploring connection and relationship with a focus on first nation knowledges as well as neurobiology, attachment and trauma integration. Her work is about relationships and connection with people, with country and with culture. She is extremely passionate about providing opportunities for people to explore their potential using strength based principles with a strong focus on inclusivity.

 Michael Candy,  Synthetic Pollinizer   https://michaelcandy.com/  Michael Candy uses physical technologies to impart systems on ecology and society.&nbsp;  Candy has been involved in many international and local projects and exhibitions, notably: The Kathmandu Triennale (Kathmandu,Nepal), Pratt Manhattan Gallery (NYC, USA), The Forum of Sensory Motion (Kochi, India and Athens, Greece), The Instrument Builders Project + Hackteria Lab (Yogyakarta, Indonesia) and Hawapi (Huepetuhe,Peru).&nbsp;  In 2015 Michael won the WRO Award as part of the 16th Media Art biennale in Poland and later Prix Cube (Paris, France) with Big Dipper.    For the event at Mission to Seafarers Michael Candy will be exhibtiing his self built robot works as well as a film based on cuttlefish footage retrieved from a submersible robot he has created.
       
     

Michael Candy, Synthetic Pollinizer

https://michaelcandy.com/

Michael Candy uses physical technologies to impart systems on ecology and society. 

Candy has been involved in many international and local projects and exhibitions, notably: The Kathmandu Triennale (Kathmandu,Nepal), Pratt Manhattan Gallery (NYC, USA), The Forum of Sensory Motion (Kochi, India and Athens, Greece), The Instrument Builders Project + Hackteria Lab (Yogyakarta, Indonesia) and Hawapi (Huepetuhe,Peru). 

In 2015 Michael won the WRO Award as part of the 16th Media Art biennale in Poland and later Prix Cube (Paris, France) with Big Dipper.

For the event at Mission to Seafarers Michael Candy will be exhibtiing his self built robot works as well as a film based on cuttlefish footage retrieved from a submersible robot he has created.

 Cameron Robbins,  Field Lines,  MONA Tasmania.  Cameron’s work is based on interaction with natural forces and the elements. He has devised many ways of producing a kind of collaboration between artist and nature. This is evident in the series of Wind Drawing Machines. These mechanical devices are set up in different locations to collect random wind energy and translate it into a strangely readable format of ink drawings on paper, which themselves take on the form of the storm. This work has led to an exploration of the forms of the vortex, the focus of natural energy. Cameron has designed and built a series of Vortex Chambers, in order to study, exhibit, and film this phenomenon.  Further research into the elemental, combined with his musical career on clarinet and saxophone, has lead to the production of the Steam Organ, a self-determining musical device which is built into a large furnace structure. The Organ is allowed to play freely in the fire, expressing the heat, wind and ambient acoustic. Other sound works include  The Sea Wailing  – a tide-powered organ on the cliffs of South Australia .  Cameron has devised, co-curated, and produced many performance events of large-scale works involving composers, complex instruments, installations, fire and sound. The Current was a Double Venturi event at Melbourne Town Hall, co-curated with Peter Knight, involving 8 artists and composers creating site-specific works throughout the building. Other events include Construction in Process VI The Bridge opening night and Queenscliff New Year’s Eve 2000.  Commissions of a monumental and longlasting outdoor sculptural nature include  Meta-pier (2006) , and  Raphael Stone Circles (2005)  , a solar calendar, in outer Melbourne.include  Double Vortex (2006)  for CH2 (City of Melbourne ),  Time Beacon (2001)  in Altona (VIC), and  Double Sump (1997)  in Marree, outback South Australia .  Since 1990 he has produced exhibitions, residencies and commissions in Australia, Europe and Asia . These include shows at Museum of Old and New Art MONA (Hobart), National Gallery of Victoria (International), Setouchi Festival of Art Japan, Artspace, (Sydney), Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, ( Melbourne ), Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, Latrobe Regional Gallery, (Morwell) , Gallery Barry Keldoulis (Sydney), East China Normal University (Shanghai), Hong Kong and Korean International Art Fairs. Cameron was Artist in Residence at NKD – Nordic Arts Centre in 2013.  Cameron also regularly plays jazz and experimental music on clarinet and bass clarinet, and is a guest lecturer at RMIT Visual Arts and Communication.
       
     

Cameron Robbins, Field Lines, MONA Tasmania.

Cameron’s work is based on interaction with natural forces and the elements. He has devised many ways of producing a kind of collaboration between artist and nature. This is evident in the series of Wind Drawing Machines. These mechanical devices are set up in different locations to collect random wind energy and translate it into a strangely readable format of ink drawings on paper, which themselves take on the form of the storm. This work has led to an exploration of the forms of the vortex, the focus of natural energy. Cameron has designed and built a series of Vortex Chambers, in order to study, exhibit, and film this phenomenon.

Further research into the elemental, combined with his musical career on clarinet and saxophone, has lead to the production of the Steam Organ, a self-determining musical device which is built into a large furnace structure. The Organ is allowed to play freely in the fire, expressing the heat, wind and ambient acoustic. Other sound works include The Sea Wailing – a tide-powered organ on the cliffs of South Australia .

Cameron has devised, co-curated, and produced many performance events of large-scale works involving composers, complex instruments, installations, fire and sound. The Current was a Double Venturi event at Melbourne Town Hall, co-curated with Peter Knight, involving 8 artists and composers creating site-specific works throughout the building. Other events include Construction in Process VI The Bridge opening night and Queenscliff New Year’s Eve 2000.

Commissions of a monumental and longlasting outdoor sculptural nature include Meta-pier (2006), and Raphael Stone Circles (2005) , a solar calendar, in outer Melbourne.include Double Vortex (2006) for CH2 (City of Melbourne ), Time Beacon (2001) in Altona (VIC), and Double Sump (1997) in Marree, outback South Australia .

Since 1990 he has produced exhibitions, residencies and commissions in Australia, Europe and Asia . These include shows at Museum of Old and New Art MONA (Hobart), National Gallery of Victoria (International), Setouchi Festival of Art Japan, Artspace, (Sydney), Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, ( Melbourne ), Perth Institute of Contemporary Art, Latrobe Regional Gallery, (Morwell) , Gallery Barry Keldoulis (Sydney), East China Normal University (Shanghai), Hong Kong and Korean International Art Fairs.
Cameron was Artist in Residence at NKD – Nordic Arts Centre in 2013.

Cameron also regularly plays jazz and experimental music on clarinet and bass clarinet, and is a guest lecturer at RMIT Visual Arts and Communication.

 Jannah Quill, solar generated techno.  https://jannahquill.co/   JANNAH QUILL  is a Sydney and Melbourne based artist whose experimental approach to the uncasing of electrical processes manifests in installation, performance and recorded sound. In her live performances, she sculpts cracked everyday electronics into pulsating, beguiling and menacing fields of static and tone. Her approach to sound-making is heavily influenced by her interest in dance and club music apparatus and the ways in which this can blend with experimental, improvisatory and collaborative music.  Jannah’s music and art practice embraces ordinary digital interfaces and technological machines as materials to generate new experiences reinterpreted from the intended consumer use of the digitally banal. In her hands, solar panels generate audio signal from off-the-shelf lighting products; a laptop’s text-to-speech function becomes vocal samples on thumping techno driven tracks; and game development programs are used to create installations of deconstructed digital imagery.
       
     

Jannah Quill, solar generated techno.

https://jannahquill.co/

JANNAH QUILL is a Sydney and Melbourne based artist whose experimental approach to the uncasing of electrical processes manifests in installation, performance and recorded sound. In her live performances, she sculpts cracked everyday electronics into pulsating, beguiling and menacing fields of static and tone. Her approach to sound-making is heavily influenced by her interest in dance and club music apparatus and the ways in which this can blend with experimental, improvisatory and collaborative music.

Jannah’s music and art practice embraces ordinary digital interfaces and technological machines as materials to generate new experiences reinterpreted from the intended consumer use of the digitally banal. In her hands, solar panels generate audio signal from off-the-shelf lighting products; a laptop’s text-to-speech function becomes vocal samples on thumping techno driven tracks; and game development programs are used to create installations of deconstructed digital imagery.

 Lichen Kelp, pictured with Benjamin Hancock from a Kelp D performance for FSM Greece 17 outcomes, at Testing Grounds.  Lichen is one half of Forum of Sensory Motion with Dylan Martorell and devised and curated the Cuttlefish trip in 2018 with 11 artists. Kelp is partnering with Liquid Architecture to hold the 2019 edition and performative outcomes at Mission to Seafarers this September.  LA has just announced extra funding to expand the Cuttlefish program as part of their Why Listen to Animals 2019 program. This will be a series of kids workshops held at Melbourne Museum over the same weekend as the Mission to Seafarers event.   http://lichenkelp.com/fsm-giant-cuttlefish-trip/   Other Lichen Kelp/ FSM projects this year include an event Kelp is curating at the System Garde, Melbourne University in November. This is being funded by Ian Potter Foundation and includes artists Benjamin Hancock, Loren Kronemyer-Pony Express, Dylan Martorell, Nic Dowse - Honeyfingers, David Haines, Kelp D and musicians Nina Buchanan and Fia Fiell.   See link for some images from an earlier incarnation of this program    http://lichenkelp.com/performance-kelp-d-with-carmen-chan   Also Lichen is programming the Federation Bells later this year, presenting workshops at Signal and holding group residencies in partnership with FLOAT Gippsland, and The Unconformity festival.
       
     

Lichen Kelp, pictured with Benjamin Hancock from a Kelp D performance for FSM Greece 17 outcomes, at Testing Grounds.

Lichen is one half of Forum of Sensory Motion with Dylan Martorell and devised and curated the Cuttlefish trip in 2018 with 11 artists. Kelp is partnering with Liquid Architecture to hold the 2019 edition and performative outcomes at Mission to Seafarers this September.

LA has just announced extra funding to expand the Cuttlefish program as part of their Why Listen to Animals 2019 program. This will be a series of kids workshops held at Melbourne Museum over the same weekend as the Mission to Seafarers event.

http://lichenkelp.com/fsm-giant-cuttlefish-trip/

Other Lichen Kelp/ FSM projects this year include an event Kelp is curating at the System Garde, Melbourne University in November. This is being funded by Ian Potter Foundation and includes artists Benjamin Hancock, Loren Kronemyer-Pony Express, Dylan Martorell, Nic Dowse - Honeyfingers, David Haines, Kelp D and musicians Nina Buchanan and Fia Fiell.

See link for some images from an earlier incarnation of this program

http://lichenkelp.com/performance-kelp-d-with-carmen-chan

Also Lichen is programming the Federation Bells later this year, presenting workshops at Signal and holding group residencies in partnership with FLOAT Gippsland, and The Unconformity festival.

 David Haines, Kirlian Plant Photography  http://www.haineshinterding.net/category/haines/  David Haines has been a practising artist for nearly 20 years and has exhibited in museums, festivals and alternative exhibition spaces, including installations for the Tate Gallery, Liverpool, Artspace, Sydney, Sao Paulo Biennale 2004, CACSA in Adelaide 2005, The Physics Room (NZ), the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Museum of Contemporary Art, the 13th Biennale of Sydney (The World May Be) Fantastic and The Liquid Sea.  His collaborations with Joyce Hinterding have produced major works that have been shown in Tasmania, Sydney and Madrid, and have been featured in the opening exhibition for the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, as well as in Japan, Europe and North America.  Haines has also held academic positions in contemporary arts at COFA (UNSW) and at the University of Western Sydney.  For the cephaloPOD 19 event David is planning a sound performance with underwater black and white footage of the cuttlefish as well as exhibiting an ocean scent based on their immediate environmnet.
       
     

David Haines, Kirlian Plant Photography

http://www.haineshinterding.net/category/haines/

David Haines has been a practising artist for nearly 20 years and has exhibited in museums, festivals and alternative exhibition spaces, including installations for the Tate Gallery, Liverpool, Artspace, Sydney, Sao Paulo Biennale 2004, CACSA in Adelaide 2005, The Physics Room (NZ), the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Museum of Contemporary Art, the 13th Biennale of Sydney (The World May Be) Fantastic and The Liquid Sea.

His collaborations with Joyce Hinterding have produced major works that have been shown in Tasmania, Sydney and Madrid, and have been featured in the opening exhibition for the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, as well as in Japan, Europe and North America.

Haines has also held academic positions in contemporary arts at COFA (UNSW) and at the University of Western Sydney.

For the cephaloPOD 19 event David is planning a sound performance with underwater black and white footage of the cuttlefish as well as exhibiting an ocean scent based on their immediate environmnet.

 Selena De Carvalho,  Lake Pedder Earthworm-   The Evolutionary Straitjacket   https://selenadecarvalho.com/   Selena de Carvalho &nbsp;is an inter-disciplinary artist based in Longley Village, Tasmania where she actively engages in many different aspects of creative life, from building kinetic artworks to growing a garden. Her practice responds to notions of personal ecology and human interaction with the environment, often relating to the perceived consumption of wilderness and lived experiences of wildness, focusing on the core paradox of how we (humanity) yearn for the untamed, and yet in our desire to experience the wild, consciously or unconsciously seek to control it. This paradox operates as a framework for deeper inquiry within Selena's practice. Technology and creativity are used as a means to raise questions as opposed to providing answers.  Selena’s work has received numerous awards and residencies, and has exhibited extensively. Her creative practice is a vehicle to generate critical and creative inquiry in response to and translation of&nbsp; this time in which we are living.&nbsp;  Selena was the 2016 recipient of the prestigious Shenberg Art Fellowship for her work&nbsp; Ecological Huants (ii) exhibited as part of Hatched at PICA (Perth Institute of Contemporary Art). The curatorial board describe the work as “ both intricate and affecting. It is a work that is experiential in the best possible sense, with the ability to draw viewers into its poetic sense of mystery and magic. Both subtle and sophisticated, the work allows for different levels of engagement, moments of solitude and room for contemplation.” In 2018 she was an artistic associate for Faux Mo as part of Mona Foma and completed a collaboration with CSIRO, IMAS and Constance ARI as well as undertaking a PhD research scholarship with UTAS.&nbsp;     For the cephaloPOD 19 event Selena will be creating an interactive colour changing ink installation.
       
     

Selena De Carvalho, Lake Pedder Earthworm- The Evolutionary Straitjacket

https://selenadecarvalho.com/

Selena de Carvalho is an inter-disciplinary artist based in Longley Village, Tasmania where she actively engages in many different aspects of creative life, from building kinetic artworks to growing a garden. Her practice responds to notions of personal ecology and human interaction with the environment, often relating to the perceived consumption of wilderness and lived experiences of wildness, focusing on the core paradox of how we (humanity) yearn for the untamed, and yet in our desire to experience the wild, consciously or unconsciously seek to control it. This paradox operates as a framework for deeper inquiry within Selena's practice. Technology and creativity are used as a means to raise questions as opposed to providing answers.

Selena’s work has received numerous awards and residencies, and has exhibited extensively. Her creative practice is a vehicle to generate critical and creative inquiry in response to and translation of 
this time in which we are living. 

Selena was the 2016 recipient of the prestigious Shenberg Art Fellowship for her work Ecological Huants (ii)exhibited as part of Hatched at PICA (Perth Institute of Contemporary Art). The curatorial board describe the work as “ both intricate and affecting. It is a work that is experiential in the best possible sense, with the ability to draw viewers into its poetic sense of mystery and magic. Both subtle and sophisticated, the work allows for different levels of engagement, moments of solitude and room for contemplation.” In 2018 she was an artistic associate for Faux Mo as part of Mona Foma and completed a collaboration with CSIRO, IMAS and Constance ARI as well as undertaking a PhD research scholarship with UTAS. 

For the cephaloPOD 19 event Selena will be creating an interactive colour changing ink installation.

 Debris Facility,  Polyphonic Thinking   https://www.instagram.com/debris.facility/?hl=en  https://acca.melbourne/program/debris-facility-artist-talk/  Debris Facility is a Melbourne-based cross media artist, often generating installation, sculpture, jewellery and other wearable works. Since graduating from ANU, Canberra School of Art in 2007, they have sustained an active art practice with projects through Australia, New Zealand and Indonesia through places such as Langeng Art Foundation, Gertrude Contemporary, George Paton Gallery, RM Project Space, Dog Park Projects, TCB artinc., MUMA, Rice and Beans, Y3K, Utopian slumps, Slopes, Pieces of Eight, Alaska Projects and Sutton Gallery.    As part of Debris’ outcomes for the cephaloPOD 19 event they are collaborating with Lichen Kelp on developing an e textile based on cuttlefish skin, that is colour changing and responsive and will be the basis of a costume.
       
     

Debris Facility, Polyphonic Thinking

https://www.instagram.com/debris.facility/?hl=en

https://acca.melbourne/program/debris-facility-artist-talk/

Debris Facility is a Melbourne-based cross media artist, often generating installation, sculpture, jewellery and other wearable works. Since graduating from ANU, Canberra School of Art in 2007, they have sustained an active art practice with projects through Australia, New Zealand and Indonesia through places such as Langeng Art Foundation, Gertrude Contemporary, George Paton Gallery, RM Project Space, Dog Park Projects, TCB artinc., MUMA, Rice and Beans, Y3K, Utopian slumps, Slopes, Pieces of Eight, Alaska Projects and Sutton Gallery.

As part of Debris’ outcomes for the cephaloPOD 19 event they are collaborating with Lichen Kelp on developing an e textile based on cuttlefish skin, that is colour changing and responsive and will be the basis of a costume.

 Michael Dulaney is an award-winning writer and journalist. He is an environment columnist for the  Lifted Brow  and his work has appeared in  The Monthly ,  Griffith Review ,  Overland  and the  ABC , among others.  In 2017 he was shortlisted for the Scribe Nonfiction Prize for Young Writers and won the Overland Fair Australia Prize.  Michael will be attending the artist camp and producing an in depth piece of responsive writing. He was based in South Australia for many years and has done many pieces around the region of Whyalla and has an existing interest in the cuttlefish. Michaels writing will be incorporated in an experimental performative sense into the event at Mision to Seafarers and we will also look at seperate funding to coproduce a podcast together. Science Gallery, Melbourne University have expressed interest in co producing this work.   The Eyes Of Genius  - Lyrebird article from the Lifted Brow
       
     

Michael Dulaney is an award-winning writer and journalist. He is an environment columnist for the Lifted Brow and his work has appeared in The Monthly, Griffith Review, Overland and the ABC, among others.

In 2017 he was shortlisted for the Scribe Nonfiction Prize for Young Writers and won the Overland Fair Australia Prize.

Michael will be attending the artist camp and producing an in depth piece of responsive writing. He was based in South Australia for many years and has done many pieces around the region of Whyalla and has an existing interest in the cuttlefish. Michaels writing will be incorporated in an experimental performative sense into the event at Mision to Seafarers and we will also look at seperate funding to coproduce a podcast together. Science Gallery, Melbourne University have expressed interest in co producing this work.

The Eyes Of Genius - Lyrebird article from the Lifted Brow

 Meagan Streader,  Response VII (Partition III)
       
     

Meagan Streader, Response VII (Partition III)

 The unique and atmospheric Norla Dome room at Mission to Seafarers, Docklands Melbourne will be the venue for performative and exhibition outcomes for FSM/ LA cephaloPOD in September 2019.  We are seeking Creative Victoria funding for this event.  The national and international as well as local marine history of this building connects the event in Melbournes port to the earlier roadtrip to the shores of Whyalla in an enticing oceanic sense.  cephaloPOD Future forms:  Lichen will be seeking funding beyond Creative Victoria to further extend the life span of the cephaloPOD project over multiple venues and partnerships, as well as producing a podcast on the cuttlefish, Whyalla and the artist residency program over the coming years.  Lichen also has met with Programme Director, Ryan Jefferies of Science Museum, Melbourne. THe Science Gallery are interested in hosting a series of cuttlefish related outcomes across 2019-2021. Ryan is also connecting Lichen, FSM and LA to MOD, a future focused science gallery based out of the University of South Australia.. Tessa Laird, Professor of…. has expressed interest in attending future configurations of the cephaloPOD trip and joining a cuttlefish reading and research group that FSM and LA will be holding at Siteworks in March as part of an outcome from a writers residency.
       
     

The unique and atmospheric Norla Dome room at Mission to Seafarers, Docklands Melbourne will be the venue for performative and exhibition outcomes for FSM/ LA cephaloPOD in September 2019.

We are seeking Creative Victoria funding for this event.

The national and international as well as local marine history of this building connects the event in Melbournes port to the earlier roadtrip to the shores of Whyalla in an enticing oceanic sense.

cephaloPOD Future forms:

Lichen will be seeking funding beyond Creative Victoria to further extend the life span of the cephaloPOD project over multiple venues and partnerships, as well as producing a podcast on the cuttlefish, Whyalla and the artist residency program over the coming years.

Lichen also has met with Programme Director, Ryan Jefferies of Science Museum, Melbourne. THe Science Gallery are interested in hosting a series of cuttlefish related outcomes across 2019-2021. Ryan is also connecting Lichen, FSM and LA to MOD, a future focused science gallery based out of the University of South Australia.. Tessa Laird, Professor of…. has expressed interest in attending future configurations of the cephaloPOD trip and joining a cuttlefish reading and research group that FSM and LA will be holding at Siteworks in March as part of an outcome from a writers residency.